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WWI

The Daily Colonist, October 23, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

Heavy fighting continues on both fronts. Line on the Western front are largely unchanged. On the Eastern front Germans have been repulsed from Warsaw by Russians.

• Indian troops fighting for the British Empire lauded by Lord Crewe, Secretary of State for India.
• Turkey still not officially in the war, but Germans are running the government and in control of the forts.
• Sedro-Woolley bank robbers caught in a gun-fight just north of the border from Blaine. Two of the robbers killed, one immigration officer killed.
• United States imposes a 15% duty on lumber with no warning to B.C. producers.
• Two new battalions to be raised and trained, one in Victoria and one in Vancouver.
• "Members of German and Austrian birth and parentage" are barred from a London golf club.
• Flooding from a typhoon a couple days ago is hampering Japanese and British advance on German fort at Tsing Tau.
• Full page ad for "Made In Victoria Fair"
• Cute Hallowe'en ad.


The Daily Colonist, October 22, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

• Panoramic view of River Aisne
• Germans planning aerial raid on London. London preparing.
• Evidence that Germans had been laying foundations for gun emplacements near Dunkirk before the war started.
• Evidence that Germany established a supply and communications network in Russian Poland before war started.
• Sedro-Woolley bank robbery suspects arrested in Burnaby
• Internments of "enemy aliens" beginning in England [Canada won't be far behind]
• Quarter page ad urging merchants to push "Made in Canada" goods.
• Ad for gasoline at 18¢ per gallon [that's about 3.9¢ per litre]
• Fantastically illustrated quarter page ad for Fry's Cocoa


The Daily Colonist, October 21, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

German attempts to advance along the coast of Belgium toward the English Channel continue to not go well. Serbians have taken forts in Sarajevo (and even though that's were the war started, it does seem like a side-show now.)

• An estimated two million Belgians are refugees outside Belgium
• Body washed ashore near Carmanah
• Bomb explodes in Montréal.
• Proposal to build "airships of all types" in Victoria.
• Miss Frankie Seigel, "first-rate blackface comedian of the Bert Williams type" to perform at Pantages Theatre.
• "More Reports of Atrocities" by Germans at length and in gruesome detail.


The Daily Colonist, October 20, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today:

• German advance toward French ports on the English Channel still stymied.
• Hundreds of thousands of Belgian refugees in England and Netherlands. Those still in Belgium facing starvation.
• Trade negotiations for British Columbia to provide lumber to Australia at a preferential within-the-Empire rate going well.


The Daily Colonist, October 18, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today:

• Map showing current lines of the Western front.
• Summary of the current state of the war
• Boer rebellion
• Armed bank robbers in Sedro-Woolley
• Naval fighting on Lake Nyassa [Lake Malawi]
• Summary of the weeks events in the Children's section of the Sunday magazine


The Daily Colonist, October 17, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today:

• Large photos of Plymouth harbour, where Canadian troops are arriving
• Belgian Queen Elizabeth staying with her husband King Albert at the front, called "an example of dignity and courage worthy of classic times."
• Correspondent recounts experience visiting Canadians encamped on Salisbury Plain.
• German push toward Dunkirk not going well.


The Daily Colonist, October 16, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today:

• Estimated the 150,000 Belgian refugees are now in England
• German reconnaissance aeroplane downed over Ostend.
• It is suggested that London's art treasures be moved to safer locations to protect them from possible raids by airships.
• Canadian troops arriving in Plymouth
• Seventy-five or so men from Vancouver and twenty-five from Victoria currently training in Victoria to serve in Bermuda.
• First British ships arriving in U.K. from the west coast via the Panama Canal.
• Panama canal currently closed do to landslide.
• Boston considering starting a professional hockey team


The Daily Colonist, October 15, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

Lead news is about how well protected French ports such as Calais are, but it comes off as hollow propaganda after the fall of Antwerp, one of the best fortified cities in Western Europe and...


The Daily Colonist, October 14, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today:

• Map of the Russian front featured prominently on the front page, but most of the stories are about Antwerp.
• "Antwerp Gets Usual Orders" - food to be provided to Germans, etc..
• Canadian training and staging area in England established on Salisbury Plain
• Germans reported to be producing heavy guns with an unprecedented range of 25 miles (40 Km).
• Boston Braves win the World Series.
• And in local news, pod of "blackfish" [killer whales / orca] "spoil" sport fishing for most of the day in the Sannich Arm by scaring off all the salmon.


The Daily Colonist, October 13, 1914

News out of Victoria, British Columbia, 100 years ago today.

Most of the news is the dénouement for the fall of Antwerp. The stories conflict. Generally it seems that the Belgian army sabotaged their own forts before retreating so the Germans wouldn't be able use the city as a fortified base. It seems that some British troops accidentally (by British accounts) or intentionally (by German accounts) crossed into the neutral territory of the Netherlands and were disarmed by the Dutch. The Germans are reporting that they have secured vast resources for their army [which will come at the expense of those left in the area. To this day, 100 years later, I find it all but impossible not to eat whatever I am offered, regardless of whether I am actually hungry or not, because of my grandmother's constant insistence to "eat for the hunger that comes." She is 10 years old in 1914, and will soon be starving under the German occupation, and then will go through it all again in 1940. 1914 may seem like ancient history, but here I am, still touched by it in a direct way.]


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