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[March 10] Getting up to the Golden Gallery at the top of the dome is literally not for the faint of heart. At the point you run into these stairs you are standing on the top of the inner dome. You can look down through the oculus at the floor 218 feet (66.45 m, or ~21 storeys) below. There's about 20 more metres to go to the top. The centre post of this spiral kind of grossed me out, there's a layer of dead skin built up on it. It's vaguely sticky. Still, onward and upward...
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[March 10] Some old graffiti along the stairs up to the dome.
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[March 10] The north transept with regimental flags from as far back as the 18th century. In the background is the Middlesex Chapel.
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[March 10] Contemporary (2014) memorials to WWI dead. There are two of these that face each other across the nave.
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[March 10] Monument to the Duke of Wellington, who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo, and a memorial tablet to the soldiers of the Indian Army. I visited Waterloo as a kid 40 years before this. What I remember most vividly from that trip was, literally, a trip. Being too busy trying to take everything in I fell way behind my mother and sisters. I ran to catch up and tripped on a cobblestone. I stumbled forward for several metres before finally falling. I also managed to dislodge the stone I tripped over. It was my understanding that the road had been laid down by Romans. For 2,000 years that stone had been there, through countless wars, and yet it was no match for the awkwardness of 12-year old me. I did put it back, though. The memorial to the Indian Army reads:VRI ERI(VII) GRI(V) ERI(VIII) GRI(VI)[which stands for, in Latin, Queen Victoria Empress, King Edward the Seventh Emperor, King George the Fifth Emperor, King Edward the Eighth Emperor, King George the Sixth Emperor]1746 - 1947This tablet commemorates 201 years of faithful service given by British Indian & Gurkha soldiers who as comrades served in the Indian Army in the employ of the Honourable East India Company and after 1858 under the Crown.The Indian Army served in the former Indian Empire and overseas in peace and war. Since its first overseas expedition in 1762 its soldiers took part in 31 expeditions & fought in 83 frontier campaigns. During the First World War this army sent more than one million soldiers overseas. In the Second World War two millions were on active service. During these conflicts the Indian Army served alongside British & Allied forces in Europe, Africa and Asia. In the two centuries of service here commemorated this was a volunteer army.
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